Yearly Archives: 2017

Do Joint Replacements Set Off Airport Metal Detectors?

If you’ve had joint replacement surgery and you’re planning a trip, you may wonder how your prosthetic implant could affect airport security.

Metal Detectors

If you’re taking a plane to your destination, leave yourself a little extra time to get through the airport security line. Your artificial implant will probably set off the metal detector — more than 90 percent do.

The good news is that you shouldn’t be delayed by security for long if the airport metal detector beeps. Follow our advice, and your implant won’t cost you much time or give you any trouble.

Do You Need a Joint Replacement ID Card?

In the past, orthopedic surgeons gave joint replacement patients a special ID card to carry when traveling, stating that they had an artificial joint. Patients could show the card to airport security if the metal detector beeped, and all was well.

Now, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) doesn’t require patients to carry implant identification cards. What’s more, the TSA doesn’t even see these cards as valid. The reason? With today’s technology, forging the document is just too easy.

So the bottom line is, you won’t be able to whip out a card and slide past security if your implant sets off the airport metal detector. You will be pulled aside for additional screening.

How Do Joint Replacement Patients Get Past Airport Security?

Fortunately, you can easily show the airport security staff that your artificial implant was the reason for setting off the metal detector.

For many joint replacement patients, the simplest way to get through airport security is to opt for X-ray screening. The imaging technology clearly reveals implants, which makes getting to the gate faster.

If you’re selected for a pat-down after the metal detector beeps, you can reveal your surgical scar and be quickly on your way. Wear loose-fitting clothes, just in case, so you won’t have to strip down to show off your scar.

The TSA also has a card that patients with disabilities and medical conditions can bring to the airport. While it won’t prevent you from being subject to further screening after setting off the metal detector, showing the card can be a discreet way to communicate your screening needs to the airport security staff.

What About International Airports?

Airports outside of the United States may have different security protocols for screening visitors.

However, the same basic principles hold true, regardless of where you travel. You should let the airport security staff know that you have an artificial implant. And be prepared for an extra level of screening. Plan ahead and give yourself extra time to get through security.

For more tips and information on living with a joint replacement, make an appointment with Dr. Trevor Magee at Core Orthopedics & Sports Medicine in northern Utah.

As a fellowship-trained, board-certified expert in joint reconstruction with a specialization in robotic-assisted surgery, Dr. Magee can offer expert advice to keep your replacement joint in great shape for as long as possible. For answers to all your questions about joint replacement, contact our Salt Lake City, Sandy or Park City office today.

Trevor Magee, MD
Dr. Trevor Magee, MD, is one of Utah’s most experienced Mako® surgeons, performing both robotic-assisted partial knee replacements and robotic-assisted total hip replacements. Dr. Magee is a board certified fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgery as well as a fellow of the American Academy of Hip and Knee Surgeons.

He is also active in the Utah Chapter of Operation Walk, a private, not-for-profit, volunteer medical service organization that provides free joint replacement in developing countries and in the United States.

Knee Replacement Surgery and Fall Risks

If you’re having knee replacement surgery this winter, you may have concerns about falling. With all the ice and snow here in northern Utah — and with you a little unsteady on your feet — you have a right to be worried about taking a tumble after surgery.

Knee Replacement Surgery

So what will happen if you have a bad fall? Will you need to have revision knee replacement surgery?

Falling shortly after your procedure poses a greater threat to your prosthetic implant than falling long after healing from knee arthroplasty. But since any fall can cause serious injury, it’s always a good idea to practice caution.

Falling in the Weeks After Knee Replacement Surgery

The first several weeks following knee arthroplasty is the worst time for a fall.

If you fall on your knee soon after surgery when your joint replacement is still healing, you may damage the prosthetic implant. In that case, you might end up needing revision surgery. Until your balance, flexibility and strength are improved, use your cane, crutches or walker and be extra careful when walking.

Falling Long After Healing from Knee Arthroplasty

Once you’ve healed from knee arthroplasty, your prosthetic implant is much less likely to be damaged by a fall. Implants are made of an incredibly strong titanium or cobalt-chromium metal alloy along with a high-performance polyethylene. So they aren’t easy to break.

That said, 1 out of every 5 falls results in a serious injury. Each year, 800,000 patients are hospitalized because of fall injuries.

Tips to Prevent Falls After Knee Replacement

If you’re careful, most falls can be prevented. To keep yourself from falling after knee arthroplasty:

  • Wear shoes with nonskid soles and low heels.
  • Keep both of your hands-free for better balance.
  • Use extra caution to have stable footing when getting in and out of the car
  • Avoid walking on wet, icy or snow-covered surfaces.
  • Walk slowly and watch out for black ice.
  • Make sure your home has plenty of light.
  • Remove electrical cords, loose area rugs and other trip hazards.
  • Do strength and balance exercises as recommended.

Have more questions about knee replacement surgery? Dr. Trevor Magee, a fellowship-trained, board-certified knee reconstruction specialist based at Comprehensive Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, can provide you with expert answers about traditional and MAKOplasty robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty.

With three convenient northern Utah offices — in Salt Lake City, Sandy and Park City — Dr. Magee makes it easy to get expert advice and effective treatment. For more tips and information on knee replacement surgery, schedule a consultation with Dr. Magee today.

Trevor Magee, MD
Dr. Trevor Magee, MD, is one of Utah’s most experienced Mako® surgeons, performing both robotic-assisted partial knee replacements and robotic-assisted total hip replacements. Dr. Magee is a board certified fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgery as well as a fellow of the American Academy of Hip and Knee Surgeons.

He is also active in the Utah Chapter of Operation Walk, a private, not-for-profit, volunteer medical service organization that provides free joint replacement in developing countries and in the United States.

Is Hand Arthritis Caused by Cracking Your Knuckles?

Will you get hand arthritis if you crack your knuckles?

Chances are, your mother or grandmother warned you to stop cracking your knuckles as a child. But if you’re like many people, you do it anyway. Up to 45 percent of the population cracks their knuckles habitually.

Hand Arthritis

What Happens When You Crack Your Knuckles?

People used to think that the sound of a cracking knuckle was a bubble of fluid popping as the joint surfaces are separated. This theory has been disproved, however.

When you crack your knuckles, you’re actually expanding the space between the finger bones. This creates negative pressure, which pulls joint fluid into the newly created cavity. The fluid rushing into the joint space is the cause of the popping sound.

The more often you engage in knuckle cracking, the looser the surrounding joint tissues become. When the joint capsule and ligaments are frequently stretched, the more easily your knuckles will crack.

Are Knuckle Crackers at Greater Risk for Hand Arthritis?

Multiple studies have explored the relationship between knuckle cracking and arthritis of the hand. No evidence has been found to indicate that habitual knuckle crackers are more likely to suffer from hand arthritis than people who don’t crack their knuckles.

Although you might still develop arthritis at some point, your habit of knuckle cracking won’t be to blame.

Why Should You Stop Cracking Your Knuckles?

But that doesn’t mean hand doctors recommend continuing the habit.

Research shows habitual knuckle cracking may result in functional hand impairment. Compared to people who don’t crack their knuckles, knuckle crackers often have lower grip strength and increased swelling in the finger joints.

Some studies dispute these findings, but why take a chance on your hand and wrist health? Knuckle cracking is a habit you can kick. Try twirling a pen in your fingers, applying lotion or playing with a fidget spinner whenever the urge hits.

If you have questions about hand and wrist health, Dr. J. Douglas Burrows at the Center of Orthopedic & Rehabilitation Excellence is the go-to northern Utah specialist for diagnosis and treatment of the hands, fingers and wrists.

As a highly trained hand doctor with expertise in the prevention, management and treatment of upper extremity disorders, diseases and injuries, Dr. Burrows can address all your concerns about hand arthritis. To schedule a consultation, contact our office today.

Do You Have a Migraine or a Cervicogenic Headache?

A cervicogenic headache can often resemble a true migraine, causing confusion for patients suffering from this painful condition.

Cervicogenic headache is a form of referred pain resulting from a problem in the cervical spine (neck). But because migraines often involve some degree of neck pain as well, conditions are sometimes misdiagnosed.

cervicogenic-headache

What Is a Cervicogenic Headache?

The cervical spine is flexible and strong, but vulnerable to injury from trauma and wear from repetitive movement.

It is composed of seven vertebrae (C1 through C7), through which the spinal cord runs. The bones and soft tissue protect the spinal cord, allowing neurological signals and blood flow to and from the brain. This complex structure also supports the head and facilitates its movement.

Every part of the cervical spine has the potential to generate pain, including the spinal discs, nerves and nerve roots, veins and arteries, ligaments, joints and even the vertebral bones themselves.

How Does Cervicogenic Headache Differ from Migraine?

The characteristics of a cervicogenic headache that differ from migraine symptoms include neck stiffness and reduced range of motion. Pain may worsen when you turn your head a certain way or when you press on particular parts of your neck. In fact, the pain can be triggered by mechanical factors, including neck movement and pressure applied to specific points on the cervical spine — like sleeping “wrong.”

cervical-spineAnother symptom that is atypical of migraine is that the pain can sometimes be limited to one side of the head. Pain can also extend outward to the shoulder(s) and arm(s), while migraine pain will not.

Patients with cervicogenic headaches often report that, even in the absence of neck pain, the headache seems to originate from the neck and radiate upward to the forehead and eyes.

Some migraine symptoms that are not frequently present with cervicogenic headaches include nausea and vomiting, dizziness, blurred vision and sound or light sensitivity. Finally, cervicogenic headaches typically lack the throbbing that characterizes migraines.

How Are Cervicogenic Headaches Diagnosed & Treated?

Diagnosing CH can present a challenge; however, the primary indication is proof of musculoskeletal involvement. The orthopedic spine specialist will take an extensive medical history, looking for patterns of pain and headache and any history of trauma or degeneration in the neck. Diagnosis may also require imaging tests, or in some cases, neural blocks to isolate the source of pain.

The approach to treating CH varies, depending on the origin of the problem. However, pain management alone is not sufficient for most patients. Your orthopedic specialist will develop an individualized treatment plan that may involve physical therapy, manipulative therapy, pain medication, and strength and range-of-motion training.

For many patients, guided injections, including radiofrequency ablation or regenerative treatments, can provide significant improvement — especially as an alternative to invasive surgical procedures.

Seeking early cervicogenic headache diagnosis and treatment can help prevent further degeneration of the cervical spine and improve your prognosis for recovery.

 

Robert Engelen, DO
Dr. Engelen served as a Lieutenant in the Navy and operated as the medical officer for Marines in North Carolina and for a deployment to Afghanistan. He has served as a team physician for a high school and a Division II Collegiate athletic sports team in Pittsburgh, and currently serves as the team physician for West Jordan High School.

Dr. Engelen has a special interest in fluoroscopic procedures, diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound guided procedures, regenerative medicine, biomechanical analysis, and treatment of all sports and spine injuries. His unique practice focuses on non-surgical treatments.

Shoulder Pain Relief with Guided Injections

Shoulder pain can result from a range of injuries, diseases and medical conditions affecting the joint or the surrounding muscles, tendons and ligaments.

For many patients suffering with painful shoulder injuries and chronic conditions, guided injections can provide symptom relief and long-term healing.

shoulder pain relief

Guided injections are more accurate and effective — and less painful — than traditional injection treatments. Corticosteroids and hyaluronic acids have been commonly used, but guided platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow-derived stem cell injections show great promise in treating patients with painful shoulder problems.

What Are Guided Injections?

Doctors rely on their understanding of the anatomical structures of the shoulder for traditional injection treatment. Manipulating the joint and feeling the soft tissues allows for an educated guess as to the proper placement for an injection.

But with guided injections, no guesswork is involved. An ultrasound machine uses painless, high-frequency sound waves to provide a clear picture of the tissues inside the shoulder. Essentially, the ultrasound allows the orthopedic doctor to see into the joint.

Live fluoroscopic (X-ray) technology may also be used to guide the treatments, depending on the location of the injury.

What Are the Advantages of Guided Injections?

Five joint areas are responsible for shoulder function — the glenohumeral, acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular joints; the subacromial space; and the scapulothoracic gliding mechanism. These are all surrounded by an elaborate system of muscles, ligaments and tendons.

Injections of corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid, platelet-rich plasma or stem cells must be precisely placed in order to help manage painful shoulder problems. With ultrasound guidance, doctors are able to achieve higher accuracy, ensuring that the injected solution goes exactly where it needs to go.

Guided injections are also easier for patients than traditional injections. Because the doctor can see exactly where to place the injection, the procedure is quicker and less painful.

Are Guided Injections the Best Solution for Shoulder Pain?

The right treatment for shoulder pain depends on the cause, and no single solution is appropriate for everyone.

Other conservative measures such as resting the joint, applying ice or heat, taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and having physical therapy are often first recommended for the treatment of shoulder pain. If those approaches fail, however, orthopedic specialists often turn to guided injections, as the treatment is quick, noninvasive and provides fast pain relief.

Ultrasound or fluoroscopic guided injections are not a cure-all, but they can be useful for managing many painful conditions, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, bursitis, rotator cuff tendinosis and shoulder impingement. For patients whose symptoms don’t respond to corticosteroid or hyaluronic acid injections, or to other conservative treatment options, platelet-rich plasma or stem cell injections can be a safer, more effective alternative to surgical treatment.

For nonresponsive persistent shoulder pain or severe injuries — recurring dislocations or rotator cuff tears, for example — arthroscopic or open shoulder surgery may be explored. Whenever possible, however, orthopedic and sports medicine specialists seek nonsurgical options for treating chronic shoulder pain.

 

Robert Engelen, DO
Dr. Engelen served as a Lieutenant in the Navy and operated as the medical officer for Marines in North Carolina and for a deployment to Afghanistan. He has served as a team physician for a high school and a Division II Collegiate athletic sports team in Pittsburgh, and currently serves as the team physician for West Jordan High School.

Dr. Engelen has a special interest in fluoroscopic procedures, diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound guided procedures, regenerative medicine, biomechanical analysis, and treatment of all sports and spine injuries. His unique practice focuses on non-surgical treatments.

Chronic Knee Pain Causes & Treatment

Chronic knee pain can result from a variety of orthopedic injuries, diseases and conditions.

This type of pain is characterized by its enduring nature and the unlikelihood that it will go away without treatment. For many, the chronic aching and discomfort is accompanied by other symptoms, including swelling, weakness and an inability to fully straighten the leg.

chronic knee pain

Knee pain can affect people of any age, and the extent of the problem can vary, depending upon the cause.

What Causes Chronic Knee Pain?

Long-term pain in one or both knees can develop for a number of reasons, and many patients have multiple contributing factors.

Injuries resulting from sports or accidents such as fractures, meniscus tears and ligament injuries, are often to blame for chronic pain in the knee. Medical conditions and overuse of the joint are also responsible for many problems with long-term pain. Some of the most common causes include tendinopathy, osteoarthritis and bursitis.

Some people are at a greater risk of developing pain in the knees. Excess weight, a lack of muscle strength and flexibility, previous trauma to the area and playing sports that stress the knees can increase the chance of suffering painful knee problems.

Chronic Knee Pain & Diagnosis

Diagnosing the cause of pain in the knees begins with a medical history to determine the location and severity of the symptoms. A physical examination is next, with the doctor checking for warmth, visible bruising, range of motion and stability.

Lab testing may be ordered to rule out gout, infection and other medical conditions. Many patients are also sent for imaging tests. X-rays and CT scans can detect knee fractures and bone problems, and an ultrasound or MRI may be useful in diagnosing soft tissue damage.

Chronic Knee Pain Treatment and Prevention

Whenever possible, conservative methods are used to treat painful knee problems. Medication may be prescribed for pain relief or to treat issues resulting from medical conditions. For patients with knee stability problems, physical therapy is often advised.

Injections directly into the joint are also routinely used to treat painful knees. Corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid can provide symptomatic relief and improve joint mobility in some patients.

Surgery may be necessary for some types of injuries and conditions. Arthroscopy, partial knee replacement or total knee replacement can be used to reconstruct the joint. However, whenever possible, both orthopedic specialists and patients try to avoid surgery.

Biologic injections are a minimally invasive and highly effective alternative, restoring function and relieving chronic pain. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and stem-cell injections can help promote healing and aid in the recovery of chronic knee problems.

Knee pain can’t always be prevented, but lifestyle changes may help alleviate the symptoms. Losing weight, wearing supportive shoes, choosing low-impact athletic activities and stretching before and after exercise can help patients avoid knee pain.

 

Robert Engelen, DO
Dr. Engelen served as a Lieutenant in the Navy and operated as the medical officer for Marines in North Carolina and for a deployment to Afghanistan. He has served as a team physician for a high school and a Division II Collegiate athletic sports team in Pittsburgh, and currently serves as the team physician for West Jordan High School.

Dr. Engelen has a special interest in fluoroscopic procedures, diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound guided procedures, regenerative medicine, biomechanical analysis, and treatment of all sports and spine injuries. His unique practice focuses on non-surgical treatments.

Posttraumatic Arthritis Treatment Options

Posttraumatic arthritis is a chronic form of osteoarthritis that develops after a serious injury to a joint.

This condition affects more young patients — although it can affect anyone who suffers a significant joint injury — and leads to reduced physical activity and degradation of musculoskeletal conditioning.

posttraumatic-arthritis

Allowing an injury to go untreated significantly increases your chances of developing this condition. It also leads to an earlier onset and greater severity of posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

What Is Posttraumatic Arthritis?

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the term used for the degradation of a joint due to inflammation. Normally, this condition occurs after a lifetime of use, wear and tear. When you sustain an injury to a joint — in a car crash, fall or sports injury — the trauma caused by the injury can lead to inflammation and the subsequent breakdown of the joint.

Posttraumatic arthritis is common, accounting for approximately 12 to 15 percent of all OA cases and affecting more than 5.6 million people in the U.S.

If you have sustained a joint injury, your chances of developing this condition are more than 50 percent. Patients with ACL injuries are exceptionally prone to this condition. Degradation of the joint happens quickly, especially if you have any of the OA risk factors, which include obesity, a sedentary lifestyle and a family history of OA.

Symptoms of Post-Injury Arthritis

The symptoms of post-injury OA include swelling, fluid buildup and pain. Symptoms typically worsen after activity, particularly walking, climbing stairs or sports participation.

The more significant your injury, the more severe your symptoms are likely to be. If you experienced repeated injuries, or if you did not seek treatment when you were injured, the onset of post-injury OA can be swift and severe and worsen more rapidly.

Posttraumatic Arthritis Treatment and Prevention

The most effective way to prevent posttraumatic OA is to have any serious orthopedic injury evaluated by a sports medicine or orthopedic specialist. Failure to get treatment for an injury significantly increases your risk.

Rehabbing from an injury is also crucial, as strengthening and improving range of motion, along with healthy, regular movement, are critical for recovery.

Treatment protocols for post-injury OA depend on which components of a joint are affected. Unfortunately, conservative treatment approaches will do little to delay the onset or diminish the severity of this condition.

Some patients require surgical intervention, and even joint replacement. However, minimally invasive orthobiologic treatments, delivered via guided injection, are shown to be highly effective for many patients.

Specifically, both bone marrow-derived stem cell injections and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections may provide significant benefit. The sooner patients can have orthobiologic treatment after the initial injury, the better their long-term prognosis is likely to be for posttraumatic arthritis.

 

Robert Engelen, DO
Dr. Engelen served as a Lieutenant in the Navy and operated as the medical officer for Marines in North Carolina and for a deployment to Afghanistan. He has served as a team physician for a high school and a Division II Collegiate athletic sports team in Pittsburgh, and currently serves as the team physician for West Jordan High School.

Dr. Engelen has a special interest in fluoroscopic procedures, diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound guided procedures, regenerative medicine, biomechanical analysis, and treatment of all sports and spine injuries. His unique practice focuses on non-surgical treatments.

How Are Cells Obtained for Stem Cell Injections?

Stem cell injections, a form of regenerative medicine treatment, provide a long-needed alternative to traditional treatments for orthopedic and sports medicine injuries.

In the past, patients were often forced to choose between living with the pain, taking pain medication or having radical, invasive surgery for their injuries or degenerative conditions. Today, orthobiologic treatments such as bone marrow-derived stem cell and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections provide a minimally invasive option for overcoming the pain and disability that orthopedic injuries can cause.

stem-cell-injections

However, patients have many questions — and sometimes, confusion — about stem cell injections.

What Are Stem Cell Injections?

In this context, we are referring to bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy using guided injections.

A stem cell is any cell capable of becoming one of many types of cells and of renewing itself. In other words, a stem cell creates others like itself as well as “daughter cells” of differing types. Generally, these cells are inactive in the body once fetal development is complete. However, they become active again in the case of injury or disease.

For severe injuries or chronic conditions, the body’s natural regenerative processes are insufficient to achieve healing. This is why orthopedic doctors and sports medicine specialists use orthobiologic injections — to enhance the body’s natural healing processes to tackle more significant problems.

This treatment specifically uses adult cells known as mesenchymal stem cells, or MSCs. MSCs provide significant benefit because they can differentiate between bone and cartilage. Research indicates that MSCs may also be able to differentiate cardiac, skin, ligament, tendon and muscle tissue.

MSCs for injection therapy are extracted by the doctor from the patient’s bone marrow.

How Are Stem Cells Obtained?

stem-cellsOn the day of your scheduled procedure, the orthopedic doctor begins by performing a bone marrow aspiration. The stem cells will be extracted from this marrow.

This procedure is most commonly done on the back of the pelvis, specifically the iliac crest. You will be positioned comfortably on your side. The doctor will numb the skin and underlying tissue to ensure your comfort. Most patients report little to no discomfort during the bone marrow aspiration.

Once the doctor completes the aspiration, the bone marrow is centrifuged, causing the marrow to separate into layers, one of which is the all-important stem cells.

Once these cells are isolated, it will be time for the guided injections.

How Are Stem Cell Injections Performed?

Prior to your appointment, the orthopedic doctor will have determined where the injections must go to provide maximum effectiveness.

The doctor will use image guidance, either with ultrasound or fluoroscopic technology, to identify this location and guide and deliver the injections to the precise area. Fluoroscopy (active X-ray) is used for injections in the joint, whereas ultrasound is used to guide injections into tendons or ligaments.

Depending on the nature of your injury or condition, you may require only one treatment, or the doctor may recommend a series of treatments.

Because this treatment works by stimulating your body’s natural healing processes, you will not see results immediately. The doctor may also incorporate rehab, physical therapy and strength training to help you overcome the original cause of the problem. Although each patient’s results may vary, stem cell injections can offer an effective approach that is safer than surgery and long-term pain medication use.

Robert Engelen, DO
Dr. Engelen served as a Lieutenant in the Navy and operated as the medical officer for Marines in North Carolina and for a deployment to Afghanistan. He has served as a team physician for a high school and a Division II Collegiate athletic sports team in Pittsburgh, and currently serves as the team physician for West Jordan High School.

Dr. Engelen has a special interest in fluoroscopic procedures, diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound guided procedures, regenerative medicine, biomechanical analysis, and treatment of all sports and spine injuries. His unique practice focuses on non-surgical treatments.

How Does Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Treatment Work?

Platelet-rich plasma, or PRP, treatments have become invaluable for treating orthopedic and sports-related injuries. In fact, PRP therapy is used in a wide variety of medical specializations today to help patients heal faster and avoid more radical or invasive treatments.

PRP-treatment

Despite a wealth of scientific research supporting this orthobiologic treatment, it remains somewhat of a mystery for patients. Although PRP treatments have been used for decades, the field of regenerative medicine still seems more reminiscent of science fiction than reality to some patients.

Understanding how platelet-rich plasma treatments work can help take a little of the mystery out of this powerful therapy.

What Is Platelet-Rich Plasma?

Essentially, PRP is blood plasma that contains a high platelet concentration.

To create the PRP for treatment, a small quantity of the patient’s blood is drawn. Next, the whole blood is separated in a centrifuge to isolate layers of red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells, and plasma. The platelet and white cell layer is then isolated and centrifuged again to isolate the platelets. Finally, a small amount of plasma is added to the platelets to create the injectable PRP.

The manner in which the PRP is used depends on the specific application. For sports medicine and orthopedic treatments, the doctor injects the PRP into specific locations, based on the nature of the injury or damage.

To ensure that the treatment is delivered to the precise location, live, real-time ultrasonic or fluoroscopic imagery allows the doctor to “see” inside the body, guiding the injection process.

How Do PRP Treatments Improve Healing?

Platelets contain over 30 bioactive proteins that are used in the healing of human body tissue. In addition, they secrete seven protein growth factors that trigger the process of wound healing. Finally, PRP contains three types of proteins that allow cells to adhere to one another, another critical process of healing.

The various processes through which PRP treatments activate healing are highly complex. In the simplest terms, PRP injections activate the same processes the body would normally use, but amplified many times over.

For example, platelets tamp down inflammation cells and enhance cellular growth, while growth factors activate the healing of bone and soft tissue.

Will PRP Treatments Help Your Injury or Chronic Orthopedic Condition?

The research demonstrates a high therapeutic potential of PRP injections for orthopedic and sports-related injuries. But will they work for you?

No single treatment modality works for every patient or every type of injury. However, orthobiologic treatments like PRP and bone marrow-derived stem cell injections have the potential to benefit a wide range of patients who suffer from acute injuries and chronic conditions.

Tendinopathy, ligament injuries, plantar fasciitis and rotator cuff tears are just a few of the general conditions that can benefit from PRP treatment. Ankle sprains, MCL tears, patellar and Achilles tendon injuries, and jumper’s or runner’s knee can all potentially be treated with orthobiologic therapies as well.

Talk to your sports medicine or orthopedic specialist to learn more about PRP treatments and to find out if they may be able to help you.

 

Robert Engelen, DO
Dr. Engelen served as a Lieutenant in the Navy and operated as the medical officer for Marines in North Carolina and for a deployment to Afghanistan. He has served as a team physician for a high school and a Division II Collegiate athletic sports team in Pittsburgh, and currently serves as the team physician for West Jordan High School.

Dr. Engelen has a special interest in fluoroscopic procedures, diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound guided procedures, regenerative medicine, biomechanical analysis, and treatment of all sports and spine injuries. His unique practice focuses on non-surgical treatments.

MAKOplasty™ Hip Replacement Minimizes Surgical Complications

Research shows that MAKOplasty™ hip replacement is more accurate than conventional procedures for total hip arthroplasty. And when completed by a highly skilled orthopedic surgeon, robotic-assisted joint replacement seldom requires revision surgery.

MAKOplasty™ Hip Replacement Minimizes Surgical Complications

The MAKOplasty™ surgery procedure for hip replacement uses three-dimensional computer imaging along with the RIO® Robotic Arm Interactive Orthopedic System to determine the optimal implant size and to perfectly position it.

Thanks to the precision of the MAKOplasty™ robotic-assisted procedure, patients are much less likely to suffer complications than with traditional arthroplasty.

Loosening of the Implant

Proper placement and alignment are crucial to the long-term stability of a hip implant.

Gradual wear and tear can loosen any implant, but those placed with robotic-assisted technology are typically more stable and secure than those placed with conventional procedures. Because MAKOplasty™ surgery has greater accuracy, the risk of implant loosening is greatly reduced.

Hip Impingement

When a hip implant isn’t sized or positioned correctly, impingement can occur.

Impingement is a painful complication caused by abnormal contact between the ball and socket of the joint — basically, the components rub against each other. With the exacting precision of MAKOplasty™ surgery, impingement is uncommon.

Changes in Leg Length

Conventional total hip arthroplasty surgery can result in the leg you had surgery on being shorter or longer than the other leg — a complication which puts additional stress and strain on both hips. MAKOplasty™ surgery doesn’t carry the same risk, as the robotic-assisted procedure allows for meticulous implant design and placement.

Hip Dislocation

Improper positioning of an implant can cause dislocation when the ball becomes separated from the socket. Dislocation occurs most often when conventional hip replacement techniques are used — with the accurate implant alignment and positioning of MAKOplasty™ surgery, this complication is exceedingly rare.

Are You a Candidate for MAKOplasty™ Hip Replacement?

If conservative treatments haven’t worked to relieve your pain and mobility issues, you may need to consider a surgical approach. If your orthopedic surgeon recommends hip replacement, you may be a candidate for MAKOplasty™ surgery — robotic-assisted total hip arthroplasty is an option for most patients.

However, to find out for sure if MAKOplasty™ surgery is right for you, you’ll need to get a professional evaluation from an experienced local orthopedic surgeon. If you live in northern Utah, head to the Steward Centers for Orthopedics & Sports Medicine — Dr. Trevor H. Magee is one of the region’s leading experts in robotic-assisted surgery. To schedule a MAKOplasty™ hip replacement consultation, contact our Salt Lake City, Sandy or Park City office today.

 

Trevor Magee, MD
Dr. Trevor Magee, MD, is one of Utah’s most experienced Mako® surgeons, performing both robotic-assisted partial knee replacements and robotic-assisted total hip replacements. Dr. Magee is a board certified fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgery as well as a fellow of the American Academy of Hip and Knee Surgeons.

He is also active in the Utah Chapter of Operation Walk, a private, not-for-profit, volunteer medical service organization that provides free joint replacement in developing countries and in the United States.